[Read] ➫ Consider Phlebas By Iain M. Banks – Girlnailart.us

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Iain Banks which he used to publish his Science Fiction.Banks s father was an officer in the Admiralty and his mother was once a professional ice skater Iain Banks was educated at the University of Stirling where he studied English Literature, Philosophy and Psychology He moved to London and lived in the south of England until 1988 when he returned to Scotland, living in Edinburgh and then Fife.Banks met his wife Annie in London, before the release of his first book They married in Hawaii in 1992 However, he announced in early 2007 that, after 25 years together, they had separated He lived most recently in North Queensferry, a town on the north side of the Firth of Forth near the Forth Bridge and the Forth Road Bridge.As with his friend Ken MacLeod another Scottish writer of technical and social science fiction a strong awareness of left wing history shows in his writings The argument that an economy of abundance renders anarchy and adhocracy viable or even inevitable attracts many as an interesting potential experiment, were it ever to become testable He was a signatory to the Declaration of Calton Hill, which calls for Scottish independence.In late 2004, Banks was a prominent member of a group of British politicians and media figures who campaigned to have Prime Minister Tony Blair impeached following the 2003 invasion of Iraq In protest he cut up his passport and posted it to 10 Downing Street In an interview in Socialist Review he claimed he did this after he abandoned the idea of crashing my Land Rover through the gates of Fife dockyard, after spotting the guys armed with machine guns He related his concerns about the invasion of Iraq in his book Raw Spirit, and the principal protagonist Alban McGill in the novel The Steep Approach to Garbadale confronts another character with arguments in a similar vein.Interviewed on Mark Lawson s BBC Four series, first broadcast in the UK on 14 November 2006, Banks explained why his novels are published under two different names His parents wished to name him Iain Menzies Banks but his father made a mistake when registering the birth and he was officially registered as Iain Banks Despite this he continued to use his unofficial middle name and it was as Iain M Banks that he submitted The Wasp Factory for publication However, his editor asked if he would mind dropping the M as it appeared too fussy The editor was also concerned about possible confusion with Rosie M Banks, a minor character in some of P.G Wodehouse s Jeeves novels who is a romantic novelist After his first three mainstream novels his publishers agreed to publish his first SF novel, Consider Phlebas To distinguish between the mainstream and SF novels, Banks suggested the return of the M , although at one stage he considered John B Macallan as his SF pseudonym, the name deriving from his favourite whiskies Johnnie Walker Black Label and The Macallan single malt.His latest book was a science fiction SF novel in the Culture series, called The Hydrogen Sonata, published in 2012.Author Iain M Banks revealed in April 2013 that he had late stage cancer He died the following June.The Scottish writer posted a message on his official website saying his next novel The Quarry, due to be published later this year , would be his last The Quarry was published in June 2013.

10 thoughts on “Consider Phlebas

  1. says:

    Welcome to another edition of Notable Genre Author Fails to Impress Some Guy on the Internet , I ll be your host some guy Like so many highly lauded authors featured here, Banks has been haunting my shelf for quite some time now Countless are the times I have passed this book before bed, letting my eyes linger longingly on the spine, relishing the notion that I will actually read this book, some day There have even been those occasions where I thumbed it down, peering at the cover, carefully comparing it to others, knowing that I must be the final arbiter of posterity to choose one, eschewing all others to a cruel and unknown future.As always I was prepared to be impressed, or even blown away, and to tell the truth, it started off with some promise The prose is fairly solid, and that title, it s a doozy Unfortunately, the title s suggestion of literary intertextuality soon wilted on the vine, so I dialed back my expectation to amusing, rollicking adventure Now, I would be lying if I suggested that there wasn t some breed of rip snorting adventure in here, but unfortunately, it s all smothered beneath the cold, damp pillow of Too Much Explanation.It is a lamentable condition which affects nearly four quarters of all science fiction authors, and in many cases, proves uncurable I can understand the temptation you create this big, crazy world, and you want to share all of it with...

  2. says:

    Many discerning readers, even ones who like SF, will reflexively sneer if you say the dreaded words space opera One need only think of E.E Doc Smith, for a long time the unquestioned king of this particular sub genre I read Galactic Patrol when I was at primary school like innumerable other geeky nine year olds, I adored it, and particularly loved the Helmuth speaking for Boskone tagline I also remember how, aged 12 or 13, I picked it up to see if the magic was still there Oh dear It was maybe the first time I felt embarrassed at ever having liked a book, and wondered how I could have had such poor taste You will gather that he really isn t terribly good.None the less, if you love a book when you re nine, it probably has something to recommend it what s great about space opera is the sense of wonder it inspires, as you are taken outside our little planet and shown how huge and strange the larger Universe is As people like Kingsley Amis and Brian Aldiss have argued, the roots of this kind of lite...

  3. says:

    And today, mine is going to be unpopular But remember the advice from 9th grade Advanced English teacher Mrs Muench about metaphors Or maybe I mean false equivalency Regardless you are not what you like If I dislike something you love, I am not disliking you. But you may not want to read my review, friends who love this book Consider Phlebas is classic sci fi that I missed growing up Periodically, I try to exercise my genre core, and it was with a bit of read harder spirit that I picked it up Initially intrigued, I gradually lost interest as the main character, Horza, ended up in one disastrous situation after another Horza s a Changer, a shape shifting species that is extremely rare throughout the galaxy, who voluntarily works for the Idiran race in a battle between the Idirans and the Culture Disaster seems to sharpen Horza s philosophical skills, because as he attempts to save himself from da dum Certain Doom, he takes a little bit of time to compare and contrast the structured and AI dominant Culture with that of the religious and militant Idirans.I ll take C, none of the above.Honestly, I ended up bored, and the...

  4. says:

    Consider Iain M Banks an unsentimental, often ruthless writer his characters are provided robust emotional lives and richly detailed backgrounds all the better to punish the reader when those characters meet their often bleak fates his narratives are ornate affairs, elaborately designed, full of small meaningful moments as well as huge, wide scale world building all the better to deliver a sucker punch directly to the reader s gut when those narratives turn out to be ironic, predetermined mousetraps yet despite the cruelly intelligent design of his novels, a strong case can be made that Banks is a fiery humanist if the idea of humanism is expanded to include all forms of consciousness, including the psychologically aberrant, including artificial minds is there a genre specialist who is a passionate yet clear eyed even cold eyed partisan for the right of all conscious beings to pursue their own individual desires, dreams, and destinies while not fucking up the lives of other beings even his utopic, galaxy spanning civilization The Culture has its own major achilles heel in their theoretically positive desire to improve the self determination of other cultures.Consider Consider Phlebas now this is a SPACE OPERA it has it all multiple alien cultures in a race against time and each other sentient machines piratical mercenaries world hopping the destruction of orbitals and entire cities a graveyard world overseen by a transcended being an incredibly advanced, libera...

  5. says:

    I can t really say much, other than Iain Banks has become my 1 favorite Sci Fi author I love the way he fleshes out flawed, believable characters in a Space Opera setting I m always surprised by his writing, and that keeps me coming back for If you re not into the genre, bu...

  6. says:

    Posted at HeradasIn my introductory essay on Iain Banks and the Culture, Caledonian Antisyzygy and the Principle of Charity, I mention that he approached fiction with a certain kind of duality, representing and considering ideologies and viewpoints antagonistic with one another In Consider Phlebas, his first published novel in the series, he takes this to an extreme, showing us the Culture almost entirely from an antagonistic point of view before giving readers a glimpse of the positives It went way over my head the first time I read it I think I didn t know how to read it exactly, or even what it was Only after moving on to The Player of Games and finishing it, did Consider Phlebas start to take form and make a measure of sense to me It s not without its problems, but what it does well, it does very well and I have to commend it Iain Banks is an incredibly nuanced, subtle writer, and he accomplished something unique with Consider Phlebas.The narrative begins with a short prologue detailing the birth, escape, and subsequent pursuit of a Culture Mind in a rare time of war, followed by a particularly grim introduction to our protagonist, Bora Horza Gobuchul, in which he is slowly drowning in a prison cell via sewage and waste created as a result of a banquet held in his honor It s a startling introductio...

  7. says:

    This is the second Culture book I read but the first one Iain M Banks wrote One of us did something wrong, because I liked The Player of Games a lot , and yet my reasons for not liking Consider Phlebas are almost all about what the book isn t.It isn t about the Culture, for one thing Sort of Not really The other books in the series are from the perspective of a citizen of the Culture, which is difficult to define succinctly so I will just say, imagine if you lived in a universe where you were practically immortal and super smart robots took care of pretty much everything, leaving you free to live your own life to the fullest existential extent do you want to be an artist a writer do you like orgies.The main character in Consider Phlebas is Horza, a rare shape shifting dude who haaates the Culture, which he considers hedonistic and base and godless c Partly he objects to the Culture s policy of interfering with other civilizations, whether to uplift them not to mix my sci fi metaphors or to eliminate them if they pose a threat to the Culture s, well, culture This is basically the opposite of Star Trek TNG s vaulted Prime Directive, which I, as a reader, don t really have a problem with Personally, if benevolent artificial intelligences want to pop by an offer a few helpful corrective suggestions that will put a stop to, oh, take your pi...

  8. says:

    Two stars is about right.Voltaire said something like the best is the enemy of the good okay, he actually said le mieux est l ennemi du bien But what is really annoying is that the coulda been good is disappointing than the meh.Banks clearly has a great deal of imagination If he was able to discipline himself, he d have some four star stuff going on here, easily maybe better.But he fritters away his energy on irrelevant grotesquerries, like a schoolboy scrawling naughty pictures inside his textbooks, or sneaking fart jokes into the Wikipedia page for the Sistine Chapel Because naughtiness is its own reward Consider Phlebas opens with a character drowning in a room full of shit Why Because he s failed at an espionage mission, and the rulers are nasty enough to want to degrade him as they kill him Does this have anything to do with the larger story arc of Consider Phlebas Well, no it has no bearing whatsoever, other than being a memorably gross entrance for the major character.Later this same fellow will encounter a band of starving religious cannibals led by a grotesquely yes, there s that word again obese prophet Does this interlude have any bearing on the large...

  9. says:

    It s not you, it s me.I ve got to watch out for space operas I will either buy in early or I just won t And then I m staring at 400 pages of ehh.It s too bad, I really liked the idea and Banks writing seemed inspired There was a cool interstellar culture called The Cult...

  10. says:

    If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Post scarcity Society Consider Phlebas by Iain M Banks When Banks died, I was in the process of starting one of my usual re reads of the Culture novels I decided it was not the time to start that re read I said to myself, I ll just wait another couple years It s now 2017, and I m not sure I ll re read them now in one large gulp I want to be able to savour the remaining books over time One of my main attractions to Banks novels lies in his version of AI Stephen Hawking and colleagues worry about tooth and claw Darwinian features of AI, that threaten us all Why not allow for the possibility that a truly superior intelligence would follow its own independent moral code Banks machine minds have values and follow courses of action that are far admirable than what our species can manage No longer being able to look forward to a new Iain M Banks novel every twenty months or so is a source of great s...

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